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About the website

This website brings together information from numerous sources to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date view of the state of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes, health system performance and the broader determinants of health in one area. It is designed to inform policy, planning, program development and research.

Beginning in 2006, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework (HPF) reports have been released every 2-3 years. This is the seventh edition against the HPF. It includes data analysis drawn from over 60 data collections, findings from research and evaluations, and analysis of implications of the evidence for government, health services and the research sector.

There are updates for many of the administrative and survey data collections. The population denominators for most of the statistics used throughout this report use 2016 Census-based population estimates and projections that were made available in 2019. Consequently, statistics published in this report that rely on these estimates and projections are not comparable with previously published statistics.

In addition to migrating all content to the HPF website, the measures include enhanced sections on research and evaluations. These provide insights into aspects of health and service delivery that are not easily captured in the administrative data collections, but can demonstrate characteristics of communities and services that are working well or need improvement.

Over the coming years, feature articles will be published on this website to draw out insights from the data and research, exploring particular topics across the HPF measures.

The content for this website has been provided by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and the National Indigenous Australians Agency (NIAA).  Attribution for content is provided in the Structure of the HPF website section and the Publications section below

Structure of the HPF website

This Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework website contains a range of products including reporting on each of 68 measures, a national summary report, State and Territory key health indicator reports, interactive data visualisations and supplementary data tables.

Report overview

In addition to information about this website, there is: 

Explore measures

The HPF consists of 68 measures across three domains (tiers):

  • Tier 1 – Health status and outcomes measures the prevalence of health conditions including disease or injury, human function, life expectancy and wellbeing, and deaths.
  • Tier 2 – Determinants of health measures the determinants of health including socioeconomic factors, environmental factors and health behaviours.
  • Tier 3 - Health system performance aims to measure the health system’s performance towards meeting the health needs of Indigenous Australians. It measures health system effectiveness, responsiveness, accessibility, continuity, capability and sustainability.

Each measure consists of:

  • Key facts: (content provided by AIHW) Selected key facts are highlighted from the findings (in feature boxes at the top of each measure) which link to the relevant content.
  • Why is it important? (content provided by NIAA) This section includes explanation of the key issues that the measure addresses and their impact upon Indigenous Australians. The section may refer to specific objectives in national policy and practice and may also discuss limitations of the indicators included in the measure.
  • Findings
    • What does the data tell us? (content provided by AIHW) This includes a summary of key findings from the national data collected for the measure, including relationships with other measures where relevant (e.g. social determinants). Each measure has dynamic charts that the user can adjust by various topics and disaggregations.
    • What do research and evaluations tell us? (content provided by NIAA) This includes a summary of key local and international research and evaluations. The section refers to relationships with other measures where relevant (e.g. social determinants).
  • Implications: (content provided by NIAA) This section highlights implications of the evidence for government, health services and the research sector.
  • References: for research described in the measures
  • Related measures: a list of measures that a related to the current measure
  • Data
    • Data visualisation: (content provided by AIHW) each measure has interactive charts that the user can adjust by various topics and disaggregations.
    • Data tables and resources: (content provided by AIHW) The data supporting the measures are provided in downloadable MSExcel tables with comprehensive notes on sources and statistical methods used.

Publications

This section shows the latest reports by default, but there are filters to help find any previous editions, if required. Publication include current and past national summary reports and summary reports for each jurisdiction.

National summary report

A comprehensive national summary report is available to download. This provides an overview of the key statistics and summarises the latest information on how Indigenous Australians are faring, drawing from the HPF performance measures (content provided by AIHW).

An extract from this summary report is also available on the ‘Executive summary’ page on this website.

State and Territory key health indicator reports

Key findings for each State and Territory are available to download as in briefs (content provided by AIHW). 

View all publications.

Resources

Suggested citation

Website:

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare & National Indigenous Australians Agency [insert year of latest update]. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed [insert date].

Webpage:

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare & National Indigenous Australians Agency [insert year of latest update of webpage]. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework: [insert title of webpage, e.g Measure 2.01 Housing]. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed [insert date].

Acknowledgements

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the National Indigenous Australians Agency worked collaboratively to prepare the report, in particular the Indigenous Health Performance Framework Unit and the Health Systems Analysis Section. The report was prepared with guidance from the HPF Steering Committee with membership as follows:

  • Ms Debra Reid (Chair)
  • Mr Timothy Saunders (NIAA)
  • Ms Jade Daylight-Baker (NATSIHSC)
  • Dr Fadwa Al-Yaman (AIHW)
  • Dr Tomoko Sugiura and Mr Richard Percy (Commonwealth Department of Health)
  • Mr Senkham Boutdara (WA Health)
  • Mr Daniel Williamson (Qld Health)
  • Professor Ian Ring
  • Dr Vanessa Lee (University of Sydney)
  • Ms Anna-Louise Kimpton, Mr Adam Heaton and Ms Michaela Coleborne (NACCHO).

We acknowledge the traditional owners and custodians of country throughout Australia, and acknowledge their continuing connection to land, waters and community. We pay our respects to the people, the cultures, and the elders past, present and emerging. We would like to thank Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for their assistance in the collection of data, without which this report would not have been possible.

We would also like to thank all of the individuals, communities, government agencies and organisations that provided valuable input to the report:

  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics, in particular the Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, the Health and Vitals Statistics Section, the Demography Section, the Health Section, the Household Characteristics and Social Reporting Section and the Customised and Microdata Delivery Section for preparation of customised tables, data checking and technical support
  • individuals with expertise in particular topics from various organisations who reviewed draft material
  • all government agencies of the Commonwealth and the States and Territories that provided input into the report
  • Gilimbaa for providing artwork and graphic design.

Artwork story

The artwork used for the report has been derived from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan artwork created by Gilimbaa. Gilimbaa is an Indigenous creative agency accredited by Supply Nation.

The original description of the artwork is as follows:

The artwork for the Department of Health and Ageing ‘The Culture of Healing’ brings together many people from Government to community all across Australia to address the theme of health and wellbeing for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The ‘Health Plan’ is a whole of government approach, the aim of which is to initiate genuine discussion, solutions and community driven outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples within the area of health.

The foundation of the artwork is set in a grid pattern. Each area consists of different cultural markings and motifs from the Torres Straits and across mainland Australia. These markings are the tracks left by the Rainbow Serpent, the Creation Spirit, and they represent the diversity of country. The lines that make up the grid formation are the navigational pathways and meeting places. Three stars represent these navigational pathways for Government and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The plant and animal motifs represent traditional health and wellbeing – ‘bush tucker’.

The central figures represent Aboriginal and Torres Strait ancestors who teach us the traditional ways so we can keep our culture strong today and into the future. The circular motif towards the bottom of the artwork represents Government and communities coming together in discussion, working together to create better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The inner circle represents the Government from the Minister, to staff and other stakeholders and moving outwards to the Communities. The ‘U’ shaped motifs represent people seated in discussion, or a ‘Yarning Circle’.

The pathways that lead out from these people represent the expertise and cultural knowledge and understanding that each individual brings to the table of their family, their community and their people and how the ‘Health Plan’ can best benefit them for a happier, healthier and brighter future together.